mouth tumor | The New York Otolaryngology Group

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I have a growth on my cheek. Is this something to worry about?

Question:

I have a growth on my check.  It is soft a fleshy in color.  I am worried about it as it started out the size of a small pimple and has grown to the point where I am now accidentally buying it when I chew.  Should I see my doctor or is this something to worry about?

Answer:

There are many different types of growths you could have on your cheek.  Certainly, any growth- especially one that is getting bigger- should be evaluated by your doctor.   Often,  your doctor can tell by looking- but it may have to be biopsied ( having a piece taken to look at under the microscope)- or removed by an ear nose and throat doctor- to be sure.

I hope this clears things up.

Robert Pincus MD

Associate Professor Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery

If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

I have a growth in my mouth

Question:

I have what appears to be a skin tag in the back of my mouth.  My general physician has monitored and it has not grown in size, and is fleshy in substance.  I would feel much better seeing a specialist, but not sure which specialist to see.

 

Answer:

Any unusual growth in the mouth should be evaluated.   Sometimes your doctor can tell by just looking at it, but sometimes the growth may have to be biopsied or even removed to make sure it is not a cancer or pre-cancerous lesion.  Today, there is a a new understanding about oral papillomas, which are basically warts, in the oral cavity.  These may look like skin tags, but can be precancerous and should be removed.  Obviously, anything that has not grown is less likely to be worrisome, but that is not always the case.

Specialists in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (ENT) are the specialists one would usually see for this- although one may also see dentists with a subspecialty in oral surgery.

I hope this clears things up.

Robert Pincus MD

NY Sinus Center

NY Otolaryngology Group

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