If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

I had punctured sinus from left molar extraction. Can an MRI show if my sinus has healed properly?

Question:  

Had punctured sinus (during left molar extraction).  Socket was not closed properly.  Had to have repair work done 4 days later to close socket.
Had bouts of nasal congestion, burning sensation in nasal cavity, light headedness.Tilting my head back seems to help sometimes.

I am not sure my sinus healed properly.  Have had pulling sensation in left nostril.  Noises in left ear have been diagnosed as eustachian tube dysfunction.

First problem with ear was suctioning sound when I yawned (socket had sealed).  Then clicks when  congested.  Now clicks randomly.  Popping sound when I burp sometimes and the most recent is pressure in ear as if underground on train.

Can an MRI show if my sinus has healed properly?  Any image that is not radioactive?

Answer:

First of all, thank you for your question.  The roots of several teeth- especially our molars, can be quite close or actually within the maxillary (cheek) sinus.  Infections in the tooth roots or dental extractions can spread infection into the sinus- and are typically difficult to treat as the oral bacteria are often quite virulent.

Treating odontogenic (dental caused) sinus infections involves appropriate antibiotics- usually best based on an actual culture- and treating the dental problem.

Today, we will often use balloon sinuplasty- opening up the sinus with a balloon in the office- to drain the sinuses if needed.

The best way to see if a sinus infection has resolved is with CT scanning.   Low dose scans can be done, and while the radiation is less than with typical scans, there still is some radiation.  MRI’s use electromagnetic waves rather than radiation, but do not show bone- and tend to over read sinus problems.  They are much less useful, but a normal sinus MRI would probably be enough to avoid using CT scanning.

I hope this clears things up.

Robert Pincus MD, FACS

Co-director NY Sinus Center

 

If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

My nose crusts after resection of my inferior turbinates

Question:

I am from the area in Connecticut. I had submucous resection of my inferior turbinates in ’12, 27 yo male. Only tissue removed, no bone, anterior to posterior. Since, air flows too quickly, my nose crusts and bleeds like crazy. It has been the worst decision of my life.

I’m wondering if you gentlemen have seen folks like me, and if you have any experience in implant procedures (alloderm, acell) or PRP application, or if you are interested in exploring regenerative techniques to help those of us with this difficult problem. Many ENTs I have seen post surgery have turned me away.

Answer:

I wish I could offer a cure for your problem.   We know, that the nose is a filter- and by the time air reaches the back of the nose, the air should be 100% humid and 98.6 degrees.  A crucial part of this function is due to the inferior turbinates.  These are structures on the side wall of the nasal cavities.  At times, though, they can become enlarged and block the airway.   When we want to shrink down these structures, we now know that it is important to keep their mucous membrane (outer surface) intact, and just reduce the inside tissue.

If the mucous membranes are lost- either through surgery, infection, or trauma- it is hard to replace effectively.  One name for this is the “empty nose syndrome”.

We usually find that moisturizing the nasal cavities with topical ointments at the tip and saline drops- and sometimes a nasal atomizer (mist)- helps the vast majority.

I have not seen any surgical procedure really help-  although many have been tried and reported- and we’d be happy to review your options with you personally at the NY Sinus Center.

I hope this clears things up.

Robert Pincus MD

Associate Professor Otolaryngology

Co-Director, NY Sinus Center

If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

Will Surgery for a Deviated Septum Help?

Question:  

 

I wanted to know if surgery for a deviated  septum would solve my nasal and sinus passages. I have difficulty breathing due to mucus blockage.  It has gotten so bad it effects the pitch/tone of my voice.

 

Answer:

Thank you for your question.

The septum is a wall that extends from the front of the nose to the back and divides the nose into two passageways.   It is never completely straight, but sometimes will be twisted from side to side so that it blocks the nasal passages.  If is causing enough of a problem in breathing,  your ENT doctor or sinus specialist may recommend straightening the “deviated” septum.  A deviated septum may cause you to sound clogged and may predispose you to sinus infections. (sinusitis)

This is a surgical procedure, done through the inside of the nose.  The surgeon will make a small incision in the lining covering the septum and lift the lining off the cartilage and bone that make up the septum.  Some bone or cartilage may need to be removed, and the rest is placed back in the midline- so as to improve the airway.   There is NO change in the way you look after septal surgery and you should not get black and blue-  That occurs when one gets a rhinoplasty (cosmetic surgery to change the appearance of the nose) at the same time.

I can’t tell for sure that the septum is your problem without an exam.  There are many other causes of nasal obstruction, such as allergies, polyps or even temporarily as you know with a bad cold.  Additionally, one can have the straightest septum in the world, but yet have the nose blocked from any of those problems.  If you don’t have any of the other problems and septum is blocking, it is quite likely that straightening it should improve your breathing and the change in your voice that comes from not breathing well through your nose.

I hope this clears things up.

Robert Pincus MD, FACS

Co-Director NY Sinus Center

Associate Professor Otolaryngology

If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

How To Treat Puffy Eyes From Sinusitis

Congestion, a sore throat and a headache might plague you when you’re fighting a sinus infection. But your appearance can reveal your health problems, too. Puffy, swollen eyes can accompany sinusitis – and when you’re trying to fight the impression that you’ve been crying all night, there are a few simple remedies to get your eyes back in shape.

Why does a sinus infection lead to eye swelling? The sinuses, positioned just beneath the eyes, become inflamed and infected during a sinusitis attack. As a result, you might notice extra pressure and puffiness in the eye area.

When you’re fighting sinus-related eye swelling, consider these remedies for relief.

  • Take a decongestant. An over-the-counter medication can fight mucus buildup in the sinuses – and help reduce eye puffiness in the process.
  • Drink extra water. Staying properly hydrated can prevent your body from hording extra liquids in all the wrong places.
  • Try a simple massage. With your eyes closed, gently move your ring finger in a half-circle from the inside to outside corner of your eye area. Complete the motion 10 to 15 times and repeat on the other side.
  • Turn to tea bags. Steep two tea bags in hot water for about five minutes, then let the bags cool until they’re comfortable to touch. While lying down with your eyes closed, place one tea bag over each eye area, and lay a soft cloth on top. Black or green tea can help constrict blood vessels, and herbal teas can sooth inflammation and redness. Take your pick!

Whether you’re fighting eye swelling or another symptom of sinusitis, a doctor’s help can make your trouble seem more bearable. Especially when sinusitis becomes a chronic problem, longer-term medical solutions can help you cope.

For a consultation or advice specific to your symptoms, please contact us anytime. And as always, check with a doctor to be sure these (and any) at-home solutions are right for you.

If you have a question or concern, send us an email. A doctor from one of our centers will answer your question in confidence. We may post the Q & A on the blog if space permits to help others who may have the same question, but will not use your name.

Is Post Nasal Drip Curable?

Question:

Is post nasal drip curable? Can you get antibiotics for it? And do sinus infections cause it? Read the rest of this entry »

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